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September 12, 2007

Comments

Jane Henry

I'm with you Dave. My mum was the original recycler. I am horribly conscious I waste far too much packaging, and every week do battle with Sainsbury's not to give me more plastic bags then I need. (I do worry about those poor dolphins).

Have been enjoying the programme about the families being converted to green living and forced to live in the house of correction, because however bad I may be, I am not as bad as that...

We do recycle all tins, have two compost bins and four water butts in our garden, and have relined most of the house/floor to retain heat... but still.

I'm sure we could do better!

If thrift is making a comeback, hurrah, hurrah. We are far too wasteful.

Will try that newspaper one!

china blue

Aha, some of those look familiar. And of course it makes sense to put socks or gloves on one's hands before pulling on stockings - with the talons I have, I've created some shocking rips in my time.

As for clutter, I hate it. I try and get my parents to de-clutter clothes, ugly ornaments, all sorts... but they have lived and travlled much more than I, so things take on value. The thing to bear in mind is that objects have no real value, only what we give them. Being so Zen has served me well, but drives them mad. Oh well!

Pants

Hi Dave

Good to have you back. Re clutter - if you can't get rid of it on e-Bay I recommend you join Hackney Freecycle. I've passed on my superfluous items to people who are willing to pick them up on their bicycles. My five piece stereo was a challenge but Kevin managed it! Bravo.

xxx

Pants

Littlebear

I've always tried to live up to this one -- As William Morris said: 'Have nothing in your houses that you do not know to be useful or believe to be beautiful.' I even like my useful things to be beautiful, if possible.

An interesting aside. My parents both grew up during the depression years, and they both loved to bake. For We Four, it was only worth our while to wait for the batter bowl whem Mum baked, because our Dad grew up poor (and poor during the depression was really poor). When he baked, there was *nothing* left in the batter bowl after he'd transferred the batter to a pan. No lie.


Dave Hill

Thanks for those comments. I think I may launch a bring-back-thrift campaign. Think of it as a form of moral re-armament.

Jen

I was unfortunate to be a year or 2 younger than a wealthy cousin so always wore "hand-me-downs". The bit about the vaseline reminded me I cleaned my secondhand patent leather shoes with vaseline, but it never made them "new". I was 10 then, now 66 years old.

Dave Hill

Should have bought more bananas, Jen.

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